Sunnyfield Farm Barnraiser!

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Lopez Island’s only goat dairy, Sunnyfield Farm, needs an aging room to bring more farmstead cheese varieties to your table.  Please join other Lopezian’s donating to help Sunnyfield Farm grow!

Check out their sweet video and see all the Barnraiser campaign details at:

https://www.barnraiser.us/projects/sunnyfield-farm-a-farmstead-goat-dairy

 

 

 

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Lopez Island’s Mr. Clean

Written by Tim Fry of Project468

It was a beautiful summer day in July 2009. Claver Bundac, CEO and Founder of California-based biotech firm, Biomedix, decided to take his boat for a short cruise from his moorage in La Conner, WA. After an afternoon enjoying the water, Claver realized he was dangerously low on gas. He was unfamiliar with the area, and the closest thing he had to a map was a laminated placemat with a rough depiction of the Salish Sea. Luckily, the placemat included fuel dock locations, the closest of which was the Islander Dock in Lopez Island’s Fisherman Bay. Running on fumes, Claver made it to the dock. He had never been to Lopez, but like many before him, upon arrival he was immediately hooked by the beauty and friendliness of the island. Within a few months, Claver purchased a home on Whiskey Hill.

Claver’s love-at-first-sight story is a common tale on Lopez. What’s not so common is what Claver has done since fate and an empty gas tank steered him to this little island. Last week, Claver – along with the Lopez Community Land Trust (LCLT) – officially opened the world’s first food safety lab run by farmers. The new FoodMetrics – Lopez Lab, housed at the offices of the Lopez Community Land Trust, is a facility where trained Lopez food producers can establish an on-going food safety verification system for their products in order to stand up to the increasingly stringent regulations from the USDA and FDA.

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“This has never been done before,” said Claver as he gave interested Lopezians a tour of the new lab on Friday, January 15th. Typically, food safety testing labs like FoodMetrics are set up and run within big food production companies – an expensive proposition that only large organizations can tend to afford. BioMedix has set up 480 of these labs around the world for customers like Starbucks, seafood production plants in Alaska, and even the Department of Defense – for testing the military’s MREs (Meals Ready to Eat). Equipment and inventory for these labs run at least $20,000, not to mention the time it takes for trained people to manage the labs. BioMedix was willing to donate all of the necessary equipment and the time to set up the FoodMetrics – Lopez Lab, as long as the LCLT had a place to put it. When Claver made the offer, LCLT Executive Director Sandy Bishop cleared out her office. And that was that.

Soon after becoming a part-time Lopez resident, Claver became familiar with the growing – yet economically challenging – farming movement on the island. He was also aware of the impact that the 2010 Food Modernization Act (FMA) would have on food producers with limited resources. The FMA was going to require a lot more stringent and regular verification of food production, storage and distribution methods – protecting consumers against harmful allergens and bacteria such as salmonella and listeria, which causes the death of three pregnant women every day. Until now, if farmers wanted to verify the safety of their food, they’d have to send samples off-island, usually to labs in Seattle – a costly, inefficient and often ineffective way of doing so. “I wouldn’t dream of sending Lopez food samples to Seattle to be tested,” said Claver, as he described all the ways food can be contaminated after it leaves its clean, safe place of origin – the same things that can happen to food that’s imported to Lopez from off-island.

Knowing what was at stake for Lopez farmers, Claver started seeking out organizations on the island that might be interested in housing a food safety testing lab donated by BioMedix. For 5 years he came up empty. In February of 2015, another twist of fate put Claver in touch with Lopez resident, Dixie Budke, who introduced him to her neighbors, Sandy Bishop and Rhea Miller from the LCLT. They of course were very interested in what Claver had to offer.

“Here was this man offering this amazing gift to the island,” said Rhea. “How could we say no?”

Shortly after saying “yes,” plans were made, Sandy’s office was cleaned out, and Lopez became home to the world’s only farmer-run food safety lab. The “farmer-run” aspect was actually not part of Claver’s original vision. He was used to customers either hiring BioMedix to manage their labs, or hiring specialists to do so. After a few conversations with Lopez farmers, Claver realized that this model wouldn’t fly in this DIY community that tends to be somewhat wary of non-local oversight. So, instead of BioMedix running the lab long-term, Claver and his team are teaching local food producers on how to run experiments and maintain the facility. The lab can be used by any farmer or food processor on Lopez Island after completing 3 to 4 days of training. More than a dozen individuals have received their certification so far. Given the number of people who showed up for the lab’s official opening last week, I expect that number to grow quickly. The next training will be held in February.

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How does Lopez-grown food stack up against other food that’s tested in the lab? In what’s been tested so far, Lopez food is astonishingly cleaner than off-island food. Ken Akopiantz tested plums grown on Horse Drawn Farm. They were totally clean. At the same time, fruit purchased in Seattle was tested. It was swarming with unsafe bacteria. Goat milk from Sunnyfield Farm has tested cleaner than other milk. Oysters from Jones Family Farms were “exceptionally clean – way below USDA limits for acceptable levels of bacteria,” explained Claver, as he related similar stories of the cleanliness of food grown on Lopez. “That’s the thing that really surprised me,” he said. Though surprising, these results are consistent with Claver’s belief that, the closer to its source, the cleaner food can be.

I was surprised by the simplicity of the FoodMetrics Lab. It sits within a room measuring no more than 100 square feet, containing 3 testing machines resembling microwave ovens and a small refrigerator. In one corner sits a computer where farmers can log-in to their private account to upload and analyze the results of their self-administered tests. The Web-based software creates Certificates of Analysis, which put testing data and results in the format required by safety auditors. Users of the lab can access their testing data and accounts from any Internet connection by logging in with a private password. Nobody but the food producer is able to see the results of their tests.

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If it catches on, the long-term impact of such a farmer-run facility could be immense for small farmers around the world. It’s easy to see how this could revolutionize food production as we know it. Making accessible and lowering the costs of food testing gives independent farmers an advantage that until now has been reserved for large, corporate food producers. It also helps demonstrate the benefits of consuming food closer to its source – something locavores are certainly happy to see. The economic impact on Lopez could be significant. Rhea Miller thinks one outcome could be that finished agricultural products become a key source of income to Lopez. As she puts it, “it’s better to export things than to continue importing people.”

As for Claver Bundac, he had no idea that an emergency fuel stop would someday result in a cleaner, safer, and hopefully more successful food production on Lopez Island. If you’d like to hear more about “Mr. Clean,” I encourage you to stop by the LCLT to see the new FoodMetrics – Lopez Lab and sign up for upcoming certification trainings.

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Lopez Saturday Market holdouts!

 

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Three BOUNTY farmers are still showing up on Saturday from 10 – 2 at the market!  For the last two Saturdays Adam from S&S Homestead, Julie from Helen’s Farm, and Andre from Sunnyfield Farm have been there.  Next weekend may be their last so don’t miss this opportunity to buy fresh, organic vegetables, meat, and goat cheese all in one place!

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Sunnyfield Farm Medicine Walk

By Andre Entermann originally posted 5/19/15 on sunnyfieldonlopez.com

 

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We have been graced with the chance to move in some old ways. My son Weston, Elizabeth, or I get to be goatherds, which in sheep would be a shepherd. Taking the goats from the farm up the road to the Lopez Hill area feels like medicine to my spirit. I dream of having each of our land mates choose a day a week to take the goats up the hill to get their medicinal forages of choice: the wild varieties that we miss with the plow and mower. They browse on wild roses, ocean spray, willow, hardback, alder, thumble berry, you name it, they love it, and the deep roots pull up the minerals goats need. More minerals than sheep and cattle need.

This year the goats kidded fine – with no assistance, but it seems hard to keep them gaining weight and in good health coming through the first couple of weeks of lactation. After some health issues with the goats and my own stress from all the dairy related work, I received a message in my thoughts to go up the “mountain”. This is not just a walk, it is several hours up there so the goats can relax and eat and move and eat and move and lie down. And for me to read and watch and think and lie down, and eat too. I think how lucky I am to be able to maybe make this part of my livelihood and I fight my mind saying it’s not productive. I know that goat health is everything if my business is wholesome cheese and milk.

 

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Weston is more excited about that long stick than herding goats, never the less he is getting good at it. The other day he lay down next to me during the DAY in the field with the goats on one of our “walks” longer then I’ve ever seen him be still. I think it was 2 minutes. He has been coming to the Quaker meeting so maybe that’s given him some practice in stillness. Of course I dream of him being more a part of the dairy. He liked bottle feeding some of the doelings we bought.

One of the most beautiful parts of this dairy farming is managing the goats in a way that gives them the freedom to forage and gather what turns into milk and then I collect it. If those goats eat what was intended for them the milk is so nutritious and good. They spend all day eating and converting the forage that we cannot make use of into milk. Then I manage the milk in a controlled manner to change it to cheese using some old ways again. Grass and the other plants they eat do not taste good to me, but chèvre does!

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I don’t want to give the idea that I go relaxing up in the little wild patches of Lopez on a daily basis. For the most part I move electric fence out in our 35 acre pasture, fix or build this or that, and feed hay in the winter, but I would like to move with the goats more.   I gain such clarity, aside from my allergies, when I go. I have joked about taking my laptop to do some office work, off-line.

Well, please come out to see us at the Saturday Farmer’s Market. We are talking about a Wednesday market too, which we thought would appeal to locals wanting a more peaceful shopping scene. Maybe you’ll get some chèvre that was from milk made from snowberry leaves, which I guess is essentially sunlight.